Filter Results
Application
Penny Size
Gauge
Shank Length
Material
Finish
Head Style
Shank Style
Nails

Nails

Hammer these nails into wood, felt, vinyl, or other soft materials. They're typically used for framing and structural fastening since they tolerate movement at joints better than screws do.

Common

Smooth Shank -- Steel

Smooth Shank -- Galvanized Steel

Barbed Shank -- Galvanized Steel

Ring Shank -- 18-8 Stainless Steel

Framing

Also known as box nails, the smooth, thin shank of these nails decreases the chances of splitting the wood surface.

Galvanized Steel

Siding

Best for attaching wood siding. These screws combine a thin shank to reduce the chance of splitting the wood and a ring shank that grips tightly into surrounding material.

18-8 Stainless Steel

Decking

The spiral shank fastens like a screw to provide greater holding power than common nails in hardwood flooring, siding, and decking.

Galvanized Steel

Roofing

These wide-headed nails firmly hold soft materials like roofing shingles and felt.

Smooth Shank -- Galvanized Steel

Ring Shank -- 18-8 Stainless Steel

Finishing

Embed these nails below the surface for a finished look.

Smooth Shank -- Steel

Smooth Shank -- Galvanized Steel

Smooth Shank -- 18-8 Stainless Steel

Drywall

The sharp point pierces the drywall while the cupped head holds the drywall compound.

Phosphate Steel

Sinker

A vinyl coating allows for smoother installation than common nails. Sinker nails are commonly used for framing.

Vinyl Coated Steel

Masonry

Fasten wood to masonry. The thick-fluted shank of these nails grips concrete, cinder block, and mortar joints.

Steel

Cap Head

A wide cap around the head of the nail firmly holds soft materials like house wrap, roofing, and felt.

Steel

Galvanized Steel

Double Head

Also known as duplex or scaffold nails, these nails are used for temporary fastening. The first head sets flush with a surface. The second head stays above the surface for easy removal with a hammer claw.

Steel